Best Practice/Brief Paper Format:

type title here (style is heading 1)
Type the name(s) of the author(s) here and italicised the Presenting Author
Type the author institution(s) beneath each name

Type your abstract here, after leaving ONE empty line below the author(s) names. The purpose of this paragraph is to draw attention to the style and format for abstracts based on APA Style. You are advised to adhere to this format: 1.5 spacing, font size 11, and font type is either Arial or Times New Roman. The abstract is a one-paragraph, self-contained summary of the most important elements of the paper; its length may be up to 150 words for this seminar. The word Abstract is not needed at the beginning of the abstract. You can type over the text here and save it using another name. You may also include an abstract in a second language, but this is not compulsory. However, if your presentation is to be made in Mother Tongue Language (MTL), the abstract will be written in that MTL.


The Question/Problem Addressed
In this section, you state the question or problem addressed by the best practice or study.

The Context
In this section, you provide a brief description of the background of the best practice or study. This report generally comprising the following sections: The Question/Problem Addressed, The Context, The Details, The Bottom Line/Results, Conclusions/Implications, and References. The report should not be more than 4 pages, including appendices, if any. The font type used can be either Arial or Times New Roman, font size is 12 and it should be 1.5 spacing.

The Details
In this section, you provide more details on how the best practice/study was carried out.

The Bottom line/Results
In this section, you describe the results obtained

Implications/Conclusions
In this section, you discuss the implications of the best practice and how it can be transferred to other learning situations.

References (List of references using APA format, please refer to Annex C for sample)





Full Research Paper Format:

type title here (style is heading 1)
Type the name(s) of the author(s) here and italicised the Presenting Author
Type the author institution(s) beneath each name

Type your abstract here, after leaving ONE empty line below the author(s) names. The purpose of this paragraph is to draw attention to the style and format for abstracts based on APA Style. You are advised to adhere to this format: 1.5 spacing, font size 11, and font type is either Arial or Times New Roman. The abstract is a one-paragraph, self-contained summary of the most important elements of the paper; its length may be up to 150 words for this seminar. The word Abstract is not needed at the beginning of the abstract. You can type over the text here and save it using another name. You may also include an abstract in a second language, but this is not compulsory. However, if your presentation is to be made in Mother Tongue Language (MTL), the abstract will be written in that MTL.


Introduction
This format presented to you a typical full research paper report. Generally, you should have an Introduction, Background & Context of research, Literature Review, Research Methods, Findings or Results and Discussions and Implications of your findings. You should also include the list of references.
The report, including references, appendices if any, should not be more than 8 pages. The font type used can be either Arial or Times New Roman, font size is 12 and it should be 1.5 spacing. For each of the following sections, kindly adhere to APA style for writing research paper. A sample list to show how reference list is to be created using APA style is included.

Literature Review/Background & Context


Research Methods


Findings/Results/Discussions


Implications

References (example below)

Afamasaga-Fuata’i, K. (2008). Students’ conceptual understanding and critical thinking. Australian Mathematics Teachers, 64(2), 8-17.

Atherton, J. S. (2005). Learning and Teaching: Deep and Surface learning. Retrieved August 12, 2008 from http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/deepsurf.htm.

Donovan, M.S., & Bransford, J.D. (2005). Introduction. In M.S. Donovan, & J.D. Bransford (Eds.), How Students Learn Mathematics in the Classroom (pp. 1-26). WA: The National Academy Press.

Herrington J., & Kervin, L. (2007). Authentic learning supported by technology: ten suggestions and cases of integration in classrooms. Educational media International, 4493), 219-236.

Meissner, H. (2006). Changing mathematical "Vorstellungen" by the use of digital technologies – Pre-Conference Paper for ICMI STUDY 17: "Digital technologies and mathematics teaching and learning: Rethinking the terrain". Hanoi University of Technology.

Reeves, T.C. (2006). Design research from a technology perspective. In J. van den Akker, K. Graveneijer, S. McKenny & N. Nieveen (Eds.), Educational Design Research (pp. 52-66). Londaon: Routledge.

Schoenfeld, A. H. (1987). What’s all the fuss about metacognition? In A. H. Schoenfeld (Ed.), Cognitive Science and Mathematics Education (pp. 189-215). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism: A learning theory for the digital age. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning, 2(1). Retrieved May 27. 2008 from http://itdl.org/Journal/Jan_05/article01.htm.

Tomlinson C. A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzullu, J. S., Purcell, J. H., Leppien, J. H., & Burns, D. E. (2002). The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop High Potential and Challenge High Ability Learners. CA: Corwin Press.

Weigel, Van B. (2002). Deep Learning for a digital age: technology’s untapped potential to enrich higher education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Wiggins, G. (1998). Educative Assessment: Designing Assessments to Inform and Improve Student Performance. San Francisco: Josey-Bass.